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Intelligent speed assistance – The future of driving?

Smart motorways, speed cameras of all kinds and vehicle tracking, technology is playing a bigger role in our driving styles and habits. The latest development, Intelligent Speed Assistance, is something that could have a further major impact on our driving behaviours.

What is Intelligent Speed Assistance?

The Intelligent Speed Assistance system ‘ISA’ uses a video system that can detect speed signs or a GPS system that uses speed data to alert drivers of the speed limit. If the driver doesn’t reduce their speed, then the car will reduce it for them.

This system doesn’t affect the car’s braking system though. After a series of alerts, if the driver doesn’t touch the brakes, the vehicle reduces power to the engine. The car will then simply slow down to the new speed limit.

There are many models of cars that already have introduced this technology: Ford, Mercedes-Benz, Peugeot/Citroen and Renault are just a few examples.

The current problem with ‘ISA’ is that systems still show too many false warnings due to incorrect or outdated speed-limit information. A lot of speed signs need repair or are not visible due to trees etc. ISA systems will be introduced gradually in cars to provide enough time to update our infrastructure.

There is no denying the benefits of this technology as once it’s suited to everyday driving then it will clearly save lives. According to the World Health Organisation, more than 1.25 million people die each year as a result of road traffic accidents and 75% of that figure is due to speeding. It is also thought that insurance premiums will be lower, as well as higher fuel efficiency and reduced CO2 emissions.

What do you think about ‘ISA’? Would you want it installed in your car or van?

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